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Lessons Learned: Oracle 10g basics

Part of the SearchOracle.com Lessons Learned series, this week's lesson answers your basic Oracle 10g questions.

Welcome to SearchOracle.com's Lessons Learned series. Each week you will get a mini-lesson pertaining to a highly specific database or E-Business Suite topic. The lessons are comprised of information already posted on the site in the form of expert responses, tips, articles or white papers written by our panel of gurus. At the end of each month, you will be tested on what you've learned. E-mail us your specific lesson requests today.

Go to the Lessons Learned Library for additional lessons and quizzes.

  TABLE OF CONTENTS
   Can you explain Oracle versioning?
   What is Oracle 10g?
   What are key new features in 10g?
   Is performance tuning different in 10g?
   When should I upgrade to 10g?

This week's teachers:

 

Carol Francum

 

Brian Peasland

 

Don Burleson

 

Paul Baumgartel


 


  Can you explain Oracle versioning?
[ Return to Table of Contents ]

In my opinion, the numbers have always been confusing. It has become a DBA rite of passage: "What was your first database version?" followed by, "Back then migration was a bear." The database (a.k.a. the server) really has two critical components: The data information residing in datafiles on a particular computer and the software controlling the information, which allows input from forms and output to reports. Common Oracle database versions are 7.3, 8.1.7 (8i) and 9.2 (9i). The "i" means "Internet enabled." The 8i and 9i versions of the database provide extensive capability to support easy Internet access. Oracle recently released 10g, which provides the ability to perform grid computing, dynamically tapping the unused processor cycles of distributed, networked computers.

Excerpted from Carol Francum's "Understand Oracle versioning: 8i through 11i.10."

 


  What is Oracle 10g?
[ Return to Table of Contents ]

Oracle 10g is Oracle Corp.'s newest RDBMS server. Oracle is touting the 'g' in 10g as the "grid" database. A grid database is a system that can leverage the computing resources of a grid. A grid is many different servers, each with their own memory, CPUs and other resources. The idea is to use resources on an under-used server to provide more computing resources to the database.

Excerpted from Brian Peasland's "10g and the grid."

 


  What are key new features in 10g?
[ Return to Table of Contents ]

10g provides a wealth of features that can be used to automate almost every aspect of its database administration. It is important to note that these automation features are optional, and they are not intended to replace standard DBA activities. Rather, the Oracle10g automation features are aimed at shops that do not have the manpower or expertise to manually perform the tasks.

The automation features appear to be aimed at bundling two products into a single package. According to Oracle's Tom Kyte: "There is a huge market out there for "small self-running databases." Following the 80/20 rule -- many things should be self managing since people are in fact not managing them. It is harder to break into this smaller market than to remove anyone at the high end. Think about it: Would you just set a single parameter -- the SGA size -- on your high-end OLTP system and let it be? Or might you tune that? You could just set the SGA size on your small-end systems and let them run "better than good enough."

So, if your 10g database does not require detailed, expert tuning, then the automated features might be a good choice.

Excerpted from "Don Burleson's favorite Oracle10g new features."

 


  Is performance tuning different in 10g?
[ Return to Table of Contents ]

The basic principles remain the same: design to maximize scalability by reducing latching and locking to a minimum; consider all options for object implementation; and compare test results for different approaches before making a decision on production implementation.

Excerpted from Paul Baumgartel's "Performance tuning principals in 8i, 9i and 10g."

 


 

  When should I upgrade to 10g?
[ Return to Table of Contents ]

Keep in mind that many DBAs don't trust production environments to the first release or two of a new product. New versions tend to have bugs which take a while to find and fix. So many DBAs won't trust this first version of 10g for anything in a production capacity, especially mission-critical databases.

Excerpted from Brian Peasland's "Should I consider upgrading to 10g?"

 


 

Go to the Lessons Learned Library for additional lessons and quizzes.


 

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