Oracle executives continue integration theme at OpenWorld

Oracle co-presidents both promised tighter integration across the company's widening portfolio of products IT's job easier.

SAN FRANCISO -- At its OpenWorld Conference here Oracle executives continued to hammer home their intention of

providing enterprise users with tighter integration of disparate products hoping to take some of that burden from its users.

In last night's opening event it was Oracle chairman Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy holding forth about their joint commitment to supply users with integrated stacks of hardware and software products. Today it was Oracle's co-president, Charles Phillips and Safra Katz making the same promise as a way of hitting back at critics who have long complained the company's products hardly work smoothly in concert.

Oracle was inspired to redouble its efforts to do a better job of stitching together integrated solutions by trying to piece together solutions for its own IT operations, according to Katz.

"Our thought process on this started with our own IT transformation," she said. "For all those years we were sending you little bits and pieces of technology that you had to take the responsibility for putting together, and that is where the hard work is."

Katz said if users were to buy a car like they buy technology, it would involve ordering thousands of parts and sent to their garages where they would put them all together.

"Then after all that work you would roll the car out only to have a little light come on and say they needed to perform and upgrade," she said.

Oracle will remain "slavishly" dedicated to open standards as a way to ensure it can better piece together a variety of its products that includes databases, middleware, applications, tools and soon, hardware systems, Catz said. But it will need to make generous investments in innovation to go along with better integration if the company is to succeed.

"We spend $3 billion on innovation every year, trying make sure we have all the parts you need to pull together complete solutions. It is all about innovation and integration," Phillips said.

Separately, but somewhat related to the company's message of integration, Oracle announced the 2.5 version of its Application Integration Architecture (AIA) that contain 10 cross-industry Process Integration Packs (PIPs) along with six new industry PIPs.

One of the goals of the new version is to help those users pursuing end-to-end solutions and pre-built integrations to essentially reduce the complexity they normally face in integrating business processes and to quicken the delivery of solutions designed to work with SOA-based frameworks.

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